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FERRY UPGRADES: Refit and rebuild for Silja
Tuesday, 20 May 2014 00:00

Silja Serenade in drydock at the Turku Repair Yard. John PagniSilja Serenade in drydock at the Turku Repair Yard. John Pagni

Estonian shipping group Tallink is investing a total of €20 million in upgrading the two Helsinki-Stockholm ferries operated by its Finland-Sweden brand Silja Line. The first, Silja Serenade, came out of Turku Repair Yard on 15 February after six weeks undergoing both technical maintenance of its propellers and shafts plus a major rebuild of some passenger areas. Sistership Silja Symphony will have the same work carried out on her in autumn.

The ships are well known for being the world’s first to have the soaring  ‘atrium-style’ high, open mall running for 150m of their 203m length. The Promenade now features several new shops modified to meet modern tastes. Two new restaurants, Grande Buffet (ex-Buffet Serenade) and an Italian ristorante, Tavolata (former Maxim’s), improve the dining range. Three premium suites and 34 new Commodore Class cabins have also been created, and there is access to the new private Commodore Lounge. JP

 

 
New hull form: Negative stem hull
Tuesday, 13 May 2014 00:00

The forward hull shape of the multi-purpose vessel Reestborg prior to launch at the Ferus Smit yard. Ferus SmitThe forward hull shape of the multi-purpose vessel Reestborg prior to launch at the Ferus Smit yard. Ferus Smit

The 23,249dwt Ice Class IA multi-purpose vessel Reestborg, completed last year by Ferus Smit for Wagenborg, illustrates one of the many new hull forms being developed to reduce resistance, the design in this instance featuring a bulbless bow with negative stem profile along with sharp entrance angles and reduced bow flare.

This combination, used in conjunction with a ducted large slow-running propeller and an engine of 4,350kW output, provided a service speed of 14.5 knots on the 14,141gt ship’s initial outing when she carried 16,500 tonnes of iron ore between Hargshamn, Sweden and Hamburg, Germany on a draft of 26.2ft. JS

 

 
Passenger ship: Unscheduled diversion
Tuesday, 06 May 2014 00:00

 An unusual visitor to Sunderland was Gann. She berthed at the Corporation Quay on 5 April for an overnight stay before departing for Aberdeen. Ken Short An unusual visitor to Sunderland was Gann. She berthed at the Corporation Quay on 5 April for an overnight stay before departing for Aberdeen. Ken Short

The small Norwegian passenger ship Gann made her first visit to Wearside after an unscheduled diversion. Used as a winter training school for sea cadets, she was carrying 184 crew and student mariners when plans to dock at another North-East port had to be changed at short notice.

So instead the vessel sailed into the Port of Sunderland and berthed at the Corporation Quay on 5 April. The 6,257gt vessel had travelled for 36 hours to get to Sunderland and stayed a day before leaving for Aberdeen. As Sunderland is not currently a passenger-handling port, special security measures had to be implemented and approved by the Maritime Transport Security Division of the Department for Transport.

Gann was built in 1982 as the Hurtigruten ship Narvik and was in service along the Norwegian coast until 2007, when she was taken over by the Sea Cadets and renamed Gann. She measures 108.6m by 16.5m.

 
OCEAN TOWAGE: Boskalis takes Fairmount
Tuesday, 29 April 2014 00:00

Fairmount Marine’s 2006-built Fairmount Alpine is one of five tugs to be taken over by Royal Boskalis Westminster. Fairmount MarineFairmount Marine’s 2006-built Fairmount Alpine is one of five tugs to be taken over by Royal Boskalis Westminster. Fairmount Marine

Holland’s Royal Boskalis Westminster NV has reached an agreement to acquire Fairmount Marine and its affiliate, Fairmount Ocean Towage Company, from Louis Dreyfus Armateurs of France. Boskalis said the addition of Fairmount’s fleet of five 205-tonne bollard pull tugs with anchor-handling capabilities will allow it to further expand its market position in both the offshore energy and marine salvage sectors. In addition, the use of the ocean-going tugs for long-distance wet tows will complement Boskalis’ existing capabilities in the dry heavy marine transport market. JS

 

 
Shipbuilding: Stocking up on the basics
Thursday, 24 April 2014 10:16

The Chinese heavylift ship Zhen Hua 29 berthed in Rotterdam with her cargo of basic hulls for the Damen Group. Nicholas LeachThe Chinese heavylift ship Zhen Hua 29 berthed in Rotterdam with her cargo of basic hulls for the Damen Group. Nicholas Leach

Like many of the world’s shipbuilders, the Damen Group of the Netherlands often has the basic hulls of its vessels built overseas and then fits them out for final delivery at its European facilities. Such was the case on 4 April when the 51,500dwt Chinese heavylift ship Zhen Hua 29 arrived in Rotterdam with a number of pre-built hulls aboard that will eventually be finished by Damen as tugs, workboats, barges and pontoons.

The shipment had left China seven weeks previously and consisted of 13 new Damen Stan Pontoons and ten other Damen vessels. The built-for-stock pontoons and vessels will enable Damen to fulfil very short delivery times as demand rises. This has also led to Damen introducing newly-designed barges and completing a number of custom pontoon and barge projects for a variety of customers. Damen can now call on four different yards in the Middle East, Vietnam and China to supply its basic hull needs.

 

 
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