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Freight route: Freight link getting busier
Tuesday, 21 October 2014 00:00

Built in 2002, the 21,287gt ro-ro Catherine has a capacity of 2,750 lane metres and greater headroom, allowing containers to be carried double stacked.Built in 2002, the 21,287gt ro-ro Catherine has a capacity of 2,750 lane metres and greater headroom, allowing containers to be carried double stacked.In just over 18 months Belgian operator Cobelfret’s Portuguese freight link has gone from strength to strength, necessitating a series of capacity increases. The ro-ro service between Rotterdam and Leixões, near Porto, was originally introduced in January 2013 as a weekly service using container ship Arx (2005/ 6,901gt).

Traffic quickly grew and Cobelfret’s 2,415 lane metre 17,287gt ro-ro Adeline (2012) was brought in from November and Arx redeployed on to a new weekly Avonmouth-Leixões link. With Adeline regularly sailing full, the larger 2,750 lane metre 21,357gt Catherine (2002) took over in March.

In April, with UK traffic levels proving disappointing, Avonmouth sailings ceased and Arx re-entered service between Rotterdam and Leixões providing a second weekly trip, with UK cargo transhipped in Rotterdam onto Cobelfret’s Purfleet and Killingholme sailings. With growth continuing, Adeline has returned to replace the Arx at the end of September. MD

 
Work boat: Largest fast crew boat
Tuesday, 21 October 2014 00:00

The 70m Muslim Magomayev is the world’s largest fast crew boat. IncatThe 70m Muslim Magomayev is the world’s largest fast crew boat. IncatAustralian Shipbuilder Incat Tasmania has delivered the 70m Fast Crew Boat (FCB) Muslim Magomayev to Caspian Marine Services as the first vessel it has purpose-built for the Oil and Gas industry. The type DP2 boat will be used to transport up to 150 offshore workers and 130 tonnes of deck cargo to multiple installations in the Caspian Sea at speeds of up to 35 knots. Propulsion is supplied by four 2880kW MTU engines, each turning Hamilton HT 900 waterjets. The vessel’s 16m beam is far narrower than usual for an Incat catamaran, but was determined by the width of the Volga-Don Canal, which the boat must transit. JS

 
Container ships: Loading innovation for boxboats
Thursday, 16 October 2014 09:58

The world’s leading shipbuilder, South Korean Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI), has proposed a new design feature to further increase the container intake on Ultra-Large Container vessels. The shipbuilder showcased the new concept recently at the maritime trade fair SMM in Hamburg.

The patented concept, dubbed ‘Skybench’, consists of a new three-deck-high accommodation block situated on top of two side casings. The side casings act as the crew accommodation block and stretch the length of two 40ft bays. The design sees the ship’s stores crane, utility rooms and lifeboats situated in these side casings. The space for additional containers is made by sliding the Skybench fore and aft along rails situated on top of the accommodation casings, creating additional cargo space and allowing for almost two complete bays of containers to be loaded underneath the Skybench and above the ship’s bunker tanks.

 
Ex-Warship: Plymouth goes for scrap
Tuesday, 07 October 2014 00:00

HMS Plymouth leaving Birkenhead on 20 August for scrapping. John EyresHMS Plymouth leaving Birkenhead on 20 August for scrapping. John EyresIn August the former HMS Plymouth departed Birkenhead after seven years of efforts to rescue the Falkland veteran frigate failed, and she was finally towed away for scrap in Turkey. In 1989 she was open to the public in Plymouth, and then in Birkenhead as a museum ship operated by the Historic Warship Preservation Trust.

The Trust rented a berth for her in 1990 within the East Float, Birkenhead from the Mersey Docks and Harbour Company, but when the Trust went into liquidation in 2006, HMS Plymouth became the legal responsibility of Peel Ports, who said: ‘We have no expertise in the preservation and restoration of historic ships and .given the fact that she is deteriorating further at berth, the group feels, reluctantly, we have no practical choice but to dispose of her responsibly.’

Built by Devonport Dockyard, HMS Plymouth, commissioned in 1959, was one of the first Royal Navy ships to arrive in the South Atlantic during the Falklands War in 1982, and was decommissioned in 1988.

 
Omni-Carriers: Nordana replaces DFDS omni-carriers
Tuesday, 30 September 2014 00:00

Fast Challenger (on left) was built as Dana America and returned to Nordana on charter after her sale to Demline of Egypt. In the background is Beachy Head, which by coincidence is joining the fleet of Nordana. Bruce PeterFast Challenger (on left) was built as Dana America and returned to Nordana on charter after her sale to Demline of Egypt. In the background is Beachy Head, which by coincidence is joining the fleet of Nordana. Bruce PeterFollowing the introduction of the chartered Visentini newbuild Wedellsborg, the Danish shipping company Nordana has announced replacement of its former DFDS ro-ro ships Skodsborg, Skanderborg, and Schackenborg. The 14,805gt crane-fitted ro-lo vessels, which were built in Japan for DFDS with an 1,884 lane metre or 654TEU capacity, have operated between the Mediterranean, Latin America and the United States since they were new in 1979, when Nordana was owned by DFDS.

Built as Dana Africa, Dana Arabia and Dana Caribia, they were renamed when DFDS sold Nordana to Dannebrog in 1984. Designated as ‘omni-carriers’, the sisters have considerable flexibility through heavylift, container, lo-lo, ro-ro and car-carrying capabilities, and stern ramp, side door or cargo hatch access. They were innovative in being able to make a ‘Mediterranean moor’ to offload ro-ro cargo in ports, while other liners waited for quayside berths.  

 
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