Ships Monthly Magazine
Banner
Strapeline

ships_news

 

For more shipping news pick up the latest issue of Ships Monthly



Wellington tugs depart
Tuesday, 27 January 2015 00:00

After a joint service of 80 years, the former Wellington tugs Ngahue (Delta 300) and Toia (Delta 200) depart Wellington on 14 November 2014. V. H. YoungAfter a joint service of 80 years, the former Wellington tugs Ngahue (Delta 300) and Toia (Delta 200) depart Wellington on 14 November 2014. V. H. Young

The end of New Zealand service has come for Wellington’s two long-serving tugs Toia and Ngahue. Renamed Delta 200 and Delta 300 respectively, the two veterans departed their former home on 14 November 2014, bound for a new life in Dubai.  

New Zealand-built, by Whangarei Engineering & Construction Co Ltd, Kupe was delivered in 1971, followed by Toia the following year and Ngahue in 1977. All three were propelled by Voith-Schneider multi-directional units which, in service, have provided superb reliability.  

Ship handling work at the Port of Wellington has now been passed to the recently-acquired harbour tugs Tiaki and Tapuhi, making the older tugs surplus. Kupe remains in New Zealand and is presently operating at New Plymouth. VHY

 

 
Salvage of bulker starts
Tuesday, 20 January 2015 00:00

The bow section of the bulk carrier Smart, which broke up in Richards Bay, South Africa last year, being towed away. TITAN SalvageThe bow section of the bulk carrier Smart, which broke up in Richards Bay, South Africa last year, being towed away. TITAN Salvage

Houston-based TITAN salvage expects to have the mid-section of the 151,279dwt bulk carrier Smart removed from Richards Bay, South Africa this month after successfully salvaging and scuttling the ship’s bow section in December 2014.

The Panamanian-flagged vessel was carrying a load of 147,650 tonnes of coal from South Africa to China when she went aground in August 2013 after encountering heavy seas. Complications ensued when the carrier broke apart after only two days and the bow section became partially buried in mud. TITAN deployed its proprietary jack-up barges Karlissa A and Karlissa B to lift the bow after all cargo had been taken off and the mud removed using air-lift techniques. The bow was then towed out and scuttled in designated waters approved by the South African Maritime Safety Authority. JS

 

 
Tragic start to the new year
Wednesday, 14 January 2015 13:53

At the time of writing, salvors from Svitzer were examining ways to recover the car carrier Hoegh Osaka, which was resting on a sandbank close to the main shipping channel with a 52-degree list. With winter gales and bad weather likely, the salvage process will be a long and complex one. Maritime PhotographicAt the time of writing, salvors from Svitzer were examining ways to recover the car carrier Hoegh Osaka, which was resting on a sandbank close to the main shipping channel with a 52-degree list. With winter gales and bad weather likely, the salvage process will be a long and complex one. Maritime Photographic

The turn of the year proved to be tragic period for the shipping industry with three serious incidents within a week causing at least 19 fatalities. The major fire on board Norman Atlantic (see page 7) was followed by the sudden capsize and sinking with all eight crew – seven Polish nationals and one Filipino – of the 1984-built cement carrier Cemfjord (1,850gt) in the Pentland Firth on 3 January.

The same day, the grounding of the car carrier Hoegh Osaka (2000/51,770gt) in the Solent made the news headlines across the country. The Hoegh Autoliners car carrier was deliberately beached to prevent the ship from capsizing and blocking the channel in and out of one the UK’s busiest ports. The Singapore-flagged vessel was an hour out of port, en route to Germany with around 1,400 cars and 80 pieces of construction equipment, when the drama unfolded.

Although an official MAIB investigation is ongoing, it is thought that a shift in ballast during the sharp turn out of Southampton Water destabilised the vessel so much that there was a danger of her overturning. The Master and Pilot were lauded for their quick actions, which resulted in no serious casualties and no leaks, with the crew of 24 and the pilot safely airlifted off the stricken ship by the Lee-on-Solent-based Coastguard SAR helicopter and RNLI lifeboats. GD

 

 
Fire sweeps through Norman Atlantic
Wednesday, 14 January 2015 13:52

Norman Atlantic, taken on her second day at Patras, chartered to Anek and just before being painted with its new livery. Christos ChatzarasNorman Atlantic, taken on her second day at Patras, chartered to Anek and just before being painted with its new livery. Christos Chatzaras

More than 400 passengers and crew members were hoisted off blazing Italian ferry Norman Atlantic in a 36-hour rescue operation involving Greek, Albanian and mainly Italian helicopters after a fire started on the vehicle deck of the 26,904gt vessel on 28 December 2014.  The 2009-built Norman Atlantic was 80 miles west of Corfu sailing from Patras, Greece to the Italian port of Ancona on charter to ANEK Lines.

High seas and strong winds hampered rescue operations, with early figures reporting 13 fatalities on board, along with two crew members who died on an Albanian tug when a tow line snapped. There were fears the death toll could rise amid conflicting reports of passenger totals.

Norman Atlantic began a charter to ANEK at the beginning of December 2014 and unconfirmed reports suggested that two months had been given to fix deficiencies which came to light following a safety inspection by Greek authorities in Patras. There was also concern when freight drivers claimed to have been sleeping in the cabs of their vehicles due to all the vessel’s 428 cabin berths being occupied. Authorities announced plans for a criminal investigation after the vessel eventually reached an Italian port.

 
Eco warriors on the march
Wednesday, 14 January 2015 13:49

Sea Shepherd’s anti-poaching vessel Sam Simon, built in 1993 as the Japanese research ship Seifu Maru, departs New Zealand. V.H. YoungSea Shepherd’s anti-poaching vessel Sam Simon, built in 1993 as the Japanese research ship Seifu Maru, departs New Zealand. V.H. Young

Flying the Netherlands flag and operated by ‘eco warriors’ Sea Shepherd, Sam Simon departed Wellington, New Zealand on 9 December 2014 to seek out commercial fishing operators poaching stocks of the Patagonian Toothfish from Antarctic waters.
Sam Simon, with a crew of 30, will meet up with another of the Sea Shepherd fleet, Bob Barker, and the two vessels, with their dazzle camouflage, will operate in the Antarctic for up to three months.

The Patagonian Toothfish is a large, slow-growing species, and a catch of 1,500 tonnes could return NZ$108 million. Stocks of the fish are very limited, so there is great incentive for ‘pirate’ operators to far exceed licensed quotas. While on their southern patrol, the Sea Shepherd vessels will also monitor Japanese ‘research’ whaling ships. Sam Simon is named after a TV producer who paid for the vessel. VHY

 

 
« StartPrev12345678910NextEnd »

Page 2 of 11

 




Privacy Notice     Cookies

© Kelsey Publishing Ltd 2013.

Facebook Twitter Google Bookmarks RSS Feed 
mail the editor of ships monthly